Long Live the Kings

Brief Project Information
Use model to predict population of salmons

SDG
More information about the project

Long Live the Kings is developing an ecosystem model on Microsoft Azure to answer critical questions facing salmon recovery and sustainable fisheries in the Salish Sea. On Azure, researchers can run up to ten simulations at a time and get results in days instead of weeks—propelling research that informs ecosystem management and policy decisions.Using the power of Azure to save salmon in the Salish SeaSalmon are an important part of Pacific Northwest culture—they are deeply rooted in Native American traditions, the health of the local sea,and the core of a multi-billion-dollar fishing industry. Hundreds of millions of dollars have been invested in hatchery and harvest reform and in habitat protection and restoration to protect the local salmon populations. However, marine survival—the time a fish spends in the water as a juvenile beforeit returns to its stream of origin—is declining in some parts of the Pacific Northwest. Chinook and coho salmon and steelhead populations in the Salish Sea have declined by up to 90 percent, and their abundance remains well below what it was 30 years ago. Salmon populations in coastal rivers have not shown the same declines, suggesting that the problem lies within the Salish Sea. The Salish Sea ecosystem has changed significantly over the past 30 years, and the problems facing its salmon are likely due to the interaction of many overlapping factors. These include changing water temperatures, reductions in food supply such as plankton and forage fish, marine mammal increases, contaminants, and disease, to name a few Long Live the KingsSalish Sea Marine Survival ProjectLast updated: 6/28/2019Finding solutions to address why salmon are dying in the Salish Sea is critical to realizing the full value of the region’s significant salmon recovery efforts—as well as ensuring future generations grow up withthese economically and culturally important species.Building a comprehensive model to implement real-world actionsEstablished in 2014 by LLTK and the Pacific Salmon Foundation,theSalish Sea Marine Survival Project(SSMP) brings together an international team of scientists and managers from dozens of federal, state, tribal, academic, private, and nonprofit organizations to determine why juvenile salmon and steelhead are dying in the Salish Sea. In partnership with the Pacific Salmon Foundationof Canada, LLTK coordinates more than 60 organizations in conducting a holistic, transboundary effort to study the physical, chemical, and biological factors affecting salmon and steelhead survival and sustainable fisheries. The SSMP serves as a model for ecosystem-scale collaborative science. Its results will facilitate smarter management and stronger returns Long Live the KingsSalish Sea Marine Survival ProjectLast updated: 6/28/2019Finding solutions to address why salmon are dying in the Salish Sea is critical to realizing the full value of the region’s significant salmon recovery efforts—as well as ensuring future generations grow up withthese economically and culturally important species.Building a comprehensive model to implement real-world actionsEstablished in 2014 by LLTK and the Pacific Salmon Foundation,theSalish Sea Marine Survival Project(SSMP) brings together an international team of scientists and managers from dozens of federal, state, tribal, academic, private, and nonprofit organizations to determine why juvenile salmon and steelhead are dying in the Salish Sea. In partnership with the Pacific Salmon Foundationof Canada, LLTK coordinates more than 60 organizations in conducting a holistic, transboundary effort to study the physical, chemical, and biological factors affecting salmon and steelhead survival and sustainable fisheries. The SSMP serves as a model for ecosystem-scale collaborative science. Its results will facilitate smarter management and stronger returns.Researchers at the SSMP are bringing together data from across these groupstoassess young salmon and steelhead growth, health, and diet; track fish and marine mammal movements through acoustic telemetry; monitor marine conditions; and develop an intensive ecosystem model of the Salish Sea, using the “Atlantis” ecosystem model to answer critical questions facing salmon recovery and sustainable fisheries. Atlantis is a flexible, modular modeling framework capable of producing realisticsimulations of ecosystem dynamics. The above content is cited from https://ai4edatasetspublicassets.blob.core.windows.net/grantee-profiles/Long%20Live%20the%20Kings_US_Bio_AI4E%20Grantee%20Profile.pdf
Sustainability Review

3.0
Average Sustainability Index Average Sustainability Index
is calculated based on
editor rating and all crowd ratings.
Editor's comment for this project's sustainability
Can protect fish
Rate this project's sustainability index and leave a comment

Do not exceed 500 characters.